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Reviews

Legacies

Riz Ahmed’s latest offering feels very apt for 2020, since its central theme dances around the fear intrinsic to the reality of our lives. Riz plays Zed, a British Pakistani rapper in New York. On the cusp of ‘making it’,…

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Interviews

Becoming my own hero

An interview with Emma Humphreys Memorial Prize nominee Shana Begum You’ve been nominated for an Emma Humphreys Memorial Prize. What does that mean to you? As a BAME woman with a learning disability, I feel overwhelmingly proud that the hard…

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Inspirations

Rebiya Kadeer 1946 –

‘I want to be the mother of all Uyghurs, the medicine for their ills, the cloth with which they dry their tears, and the cloak to protect them from the rain.’ – Rebiya Kadeer Rebiya Kadeer is a businesswoman and…

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Poetry

Belonging…

It’s like breathing  Without holding onto every breath  It’s like knowing I can take up space here  I don’t have to shrink.  & I let my guard down   I become part of life  The country I was born in   Grew…

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Reviews

When we talk about rape

Review What We Talk About When We Talk About Rape, Sohaila Abdulali The fear of rape is background noise for many women. It rises from a barely audible whisper to a screech when triggered. The stimuli can be as trivial…

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Opinions

Macron’s two-tier republic

‘We have created our very own separatism. It is a ghettoization which our Republic, with initially the best intentions in the world, has allowed to happen.’ Emmanuel Macron, President of France, laid out his vision of an ‘anti-separatism bill’ which…

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Interviews

Honouring gutsy women

Interview with Yasmin Alibhai-Brown Yasmin Alibhai-Brown is a British journalist and author. She describes herself as a ‘a leftie liberal, anti-racist, feminist, Muslim.’ Her latest book, Ladies Who Punch: Fifty Trailblazing Women Whose Stories You Should Know is an anthology…

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Reviews

“Honour” and anger

Banaz Mahmod was born in Iraq in 1985. When she was just ten years old, her father fled Iraq, and sought asylum with his wife and five daughters in Mitcham, South London. Banaz was just four years older than me:…

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Experiences

Memories of Turkey: Accents

I grew up in Turkey. This is what I remember. There were several accents… and some stood out more than others. My paternal grandmother spoke in what is known in Turkey as ‘Istanbul’ Turkish. There was a melody to it….

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Reviews

Honour: An unsensational and nuanced genre piece

‘Honour’ review The British detective procedural show is a tonally exact genre, and Honour, a two-part drama series written by Gwyneth Hughes, is a stunning display of a generic kind of perfection, marred only by a greatly important factor: the announcement…

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Inspirations

Aisha al-Manoubia c. 1190-1267

Aisha al-Manoubia, also known as Lalla Manoubia, was a Berber woman who rose to become the highest authority on Sufism in Tunisia. She was considered one of the four spiritual guardians of the capital city Tunis. Aisha was born in…

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Reviews

Body horror or righteous horror?

Review The Netflix original film Cuties (2020), centres upon a group of eleven-year-old girls forging their nascent pubescent identities, and gaining validation from sources ranging from Instagram likes to the approval of dance judges in a competition. Cuties is not…

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Poetry

March for the many stories untold

March for the many stories untold The many sobs unheard March for the many times a woman flinched Not wanting to be touched, not wanting to be groped March for when love turns purple Marriages still are March for the…

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Inspirations

Forough Farrokzhad 1935-1967

‘Perhaps because no woman before me took steps toward breaking the shackles binding women’s hands and feet, and because I am the first to do so, they have made such a controversy out of me.’ – Forough Farrokzhad Forough Farrokzhad…

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